Month: September 2015

Lady Jane Grey: Chapter XII

It is two years later. The scene is peaceful. The same scene that we had beheld in the beginning of the story now greets our eyes like an old friend. We look upon the same pastures. We see the same fences, the same sheep, and the same castle. Only now, instead of Lady Jane ruling it, it is ruled over by Sir Robert and Lady Jenny. They were married when Lady Jane came out of hiding, and they now have a little son, who is rapidly growing. Sir Terence, Nan, and the other servants have stayed on the estate at Lady Jane’s request.

But where is Lady Jane? She is married to Sir Alfred and is very happy there. She hardly misses her old lands, but she goes to visit Robert and Jenny very often for she still considers them akin to children, even though they were only her wards.

As for James, he has taken up work in a top position on Sir George’s new estates. He is getting along fine. Now a well-built lad of eighteen, he has lost none of his taste for adventure. Continue reading

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Lady Jane Grey: Chapter XI

Now that an open move had been made against Sir George, this noble knight decided to lay a formal complaint before the governor. This was accordingly done and, a week later, armed riders were sent to Dudley Cummings’ house to arrest him. Upon arriving there, however, they found the house deserted, except for a few servants. These divulged that Sir Dudley had journeyed north and was almost across the northern border by now.

Alarmed, the riders turned their steeds north and galloped on through the day and into the night. Changing horses at the last outpost, they galloped on and reached the river Stakiro, which marked the edge of the region. There, from a poor fisherman, they learned that Dudley Cummings and his retinue had drowned trying to cross the icy river in a storm.

When the governor learned that Sir Cummings had drowned he was greatly relieved that he wouldn’t have him on his hands and that Lady Jane Grey would be safe from any further assault.

A speedy messenger was at once dispatched to break the news to Lady Jane. She sent him back with a return message, which went thus: Continue reading

Lady Jane Grey: Chapter X

One dark night, a night without stars or moon, a dark figure crept towards Sir George’s castle. With a practiced arm he threw a rope to the top of the battlements and it caught silently. Catching hold of the knots on the rope he climbed up and was soon at the top. Then he climbed down the other side and slid into the courtyard.

Surmounting other difficulties, he made it to the inner part of the castle. Then he was at Sir George’s room. He stepped carefully over the guard lying in front of the door, but as he did so, was grabbed by his legs. Yelling, he realized that the guard had been merely dozing.

Guards came running from every direction and found the two men wrestling furiously. Quickly, they pulled them apart and jerked the prisoner to his feet. Sir George, meanwhile, had rushed out in his nightclothes, sword in hand. After questioning the guard if he was alright and praising him for his bravery, Sir George turned to the prisoner.

“Who are you, and why did you come here?!” He commanded in a threatening voice. The man remained stubbornly silent.

“Looks like he isn’t going to talk, my lord,” one of them said Continue reading

Lady Jane Grey: Chapter IX

At the end of that merry day the governor made a speech. In short, he expressed his delight at Sir George arrival, and he made known that the gifts would now be handed out. Presents of furniture of all sorts and sizes were heaped upon Sir George. But most special of all was the gift of a single, pure gold vase studded with precious gems. Inlaid in it with silver were the names of all the people who lived in the valley, townsperson and landholder alike. All gave vent to free feelings of happiness, and never before had Sir George felt so loved.

“O most glorious people!” he began, his voice choked with emotion, “I thank you with all my heart for these gifts, and I promise you that I feel the utmost gratitude towards you to the lowest rib of my chest. I hope you will find me a good neighbor, and I shall try my best. I will always treasure this day in the folds of my memory, and will forever remember your kindness.” Tears filled his eyes, tears of happiness, tears of joy and love. “I shall one day try to repay what you have done for me.” He stopped, unable to go on.

A lusty cheer greeted the end, and a hundred voices declared their welcome. A hundred fireworks burst into the evening sky. A hundred presents took their places in carts. Tears sprang from the eyes of the people. Sir George mounted his horse, waved a fond farewell to the people and, turning rein, cantered off into the sunset. Continue reading

My Theater Week

Last week, I worked with twenty-seven other home-schooled kids to put together a play that was staged on Friday and Saturday. It was called ‘The Wildest West Show Ever.’ It was about a crooked bad guy named Snidely S. Snoodly who wanted to turn the railroad south so that it would run right through Snoodlyville. John Henry (of the famous John Henry song) helped the Reverend and the townsfolk foil Snoodly’s plan even though he had a band of Canexican (half Canadian, half Mexican) bandits to help him. Continue reading

Lady Jane Grey: Chapter VIII

A few days later all was in order and Lady Jane and her household felt like they had lived there forever. Sir Alfred had heard the gallant story of young Robert and the bear and was fully impressed.

Happy, carefree days stretched into happy, carefree weeks. Russel was sent out every two days to see if he could find some sort of information concerning Dudley Cummings. Four weeks went by and there was still no news. But Lady Jane did not worry too much. She knew that Dudley Cummings would lie low until her cousin arrived.

At the end of the fifth week, news reached them that Sir George Walham had reached Aurora valley. A secret messenger was sent to Sir George to tell him to meet them in secret in Berna Creek, a small cave in the mountains on the far side of Aurora valley.

The moment Sir George received the message he called for his attendants and told them to spread around the news that he had gone to explore the valley’s far side. Its ice walls, they were to say, intrigued him and he wanted to find out what they looked like on the other side. He would be back in a week.

Sir George was a handsome man in his forties, physically fit but not especially strong or muscular. He had merry brown eyes and chestnut colored hair.

Accordingly, the two parties met in Berna Creek days later. The reunion was a happy one; neither one had seen the other for many, many years. Jenny and her father were so happy when they met that neither could speak for a moment. He marveled how she had grown into a beautiful young lady. Continue reading